Jonathan Kaplan

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On December 2nd,  2011, Plinth Gallery will open a two-month exhibition of owner and curator Jonathan Kaplan’s own work.  Kaplan’s solo show, “Prelude: New Ceramic Work” incorporates both hand-built and wheel-thrown elements, including a series of large ceramic basins as well as a collection of new teapot designs.  These new pieces will feature his signature use of industrial fixtures, mechanical fittings, and vessels on plinths.  Kaplan has been experimenting with an updated clay body, interesting surface textures and a palette of new glazes for the work in this show.  

Kaplan, who opened Plinth Gallery in 2007, received his undergraduate degree from Rhode Island School of Design and his MFA from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville.  He has worked in the field of ceramics for over 40 years as an artist, designer, author and educator before his current project with Plinth Gallery.

  Click here for an article in Ceramic Art and Perception

 

December  2010:  Jonathan Kaplan newest work can be seen in the show “Modern Moche”. Glimpses of this work have been previously shown at the Foothills Art Center “Colorado Clay” exhibition, The Art Students League of Denver, as well as other exhibitions in Colorado, Nevada, Texas andCalifornia. Now, the entire collection, including new pieces and new glaze surfaces, will be on display at Plinth. 

The Moche (pronounced “Mo’-chie”) culture flourished on the northwest coast of Peru between 100AD-800AD. Their style of pottery-making often used both animal and human forms on vessels and included a distinctive  “stirrup spout”, serving as both handle and pouring spout. Moche ceramics became easily recognizable by this signature feature. Kaplan uses the stirrup spout in this current body of work appropriately called Nouveau, (or New) Moche.

Kaplan, who has mastered the ceramic slip cast process, duplicates items such as children’s toys, corrugated tubes or found objects, which he assembles into highly structured vertical sculptures.  The distinctive stirrup spout provides both a cultural and historical perspective and the use of stylized animal forms imparts a subtle sense of humor to this body of work.

Jonathan Kaplan Exhibition December 2010 through January 2011