Pickles

In architecture, a plinth is the base or platform upon which a column, pedestal, statue, monument or structure rests.[1] Gottfried Semper's The Four Elements of Architecture (1851) posited that the plinth, the hearth, the roof, and the wall make up all of architectural theory. According to Semper, the plinth exists to negotiate between a structure and the ground. Semper's theory has been very influential in the subsequent development of architecture.[2]

ORIGIN late 16th cent.: from Latin plinthus, from Greek plinthos ‘tile, brick, squared stone.’ The Latin form was in early use in English.

Plinth Gallery conceptualizes that very definition of the base, the pivotal structure, that starting point for the sculptural ceramic vessel. One of the essential concepts in all ceramic work is centering, that elemental core process which provides the base or platform from which a form develops. Those artists selected for exhibitions at Plinth Gallery successfully exploit that core idea of the “negotiation between structure and ground” by the artful manipulation of material organized in both traditional and abstract ways. While idea of the vessel is defined by containment, it is precisely the content that gives the work meaning and inviting of dialog.